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Summary of Hogansburg Dam History and Slideshow


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Development on the St. Regis River has been constant since the 1760s, with several mills in existence before the Hogansburg Dam was constructed. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, the St. Regis River was flanked by a sawmill and gristmill on the east bank and a factory and electric power plant on the west bank. The factory produced baskets, toys, and souvenirs, and relied heavily on local Mohawk labor and expertise. The electric power plant provided service to 38 consumers, as well as public street lighting. All of the structures were eventually destroyed, either by flood or fire.
 
Amidst growing excitement over the untapped hydropower potential of North Country rivers, development of the current Hogansburg hydroelectric facility began in 1929 by the Malone Light and Power Company. A total of 123 workers were employed to construct the facility, many of them Mohawk. The completed facility consisted of a concrete spillway 247 feet long and 11.5 feet high, an intake structure along the east bank, and a powerhouse. The dam impounded a reservoir of 19 acres. The cost of the project was $180,000 to $200,000. Electricity generation began in February of 1930. The facility has continued operation in much the same way since 1930, with occasional maintenance and upgrades.
 
For more information, refer to the
Phase 1A Assessment PDF Icon produced by Hartgen Archaeological Associates, which gives a historical and cultural overview of the Hogansburg Dam Project area.
 
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Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe Environment Division
http://www.srmtenv.org/index.php?spec=2016/04/wrp/summary-of-hogansburg-dam-history-and-slideshow